Rib Humping

This Could Be Negatively Affecting Your Workout

Rib Humping

Let’s play detective for 30 seconds! What do you see wrong when you look at this bicyclist’s back?

Answer: If you said a high right side, then you would be correct. This gentleman is dealing with something known as a rib hump, and it affects a lot of athletes who have no clue they even have this.

This past Sunday, I went for an 81-mile bike ride, and 81 miles can get pretty boring unless you find some way to entertain yourself. Since I am a structural chiropractor and I love finding ways people can be healthier and perform better, I decided to analyze people and see what they could change to enhance their performance.

This guy stood out like a sore thumb!

In fact, I hope he finds this blog post, as he could get helped if he is not already seeing somebody for this.

Why is this important?

A rib hump is an indicator of scoliosis (abnormal curvature of the spine), which affects mostly women, but still effects 6–9 million people in our country. I would bet this number is higher, but this stat is based on how many people get diagnosed with scoliosis.

For those who want to be elite performers and function at high levels then, this should not be OK. In fact, what I have seen is that people with scoliosis have increased digestive problems, more pronounced lower back pain, decreased spirometer (lung capacity) readings, and higher numbers of forward head posture (the head sticks out over the shoulders).

This means that, even if you have the best technique in the gym and the best form, because of your abnormal biomechanics and weak structure, your likelihood of injury is higher.

Most people would wait until they display symptoms before getting this checked, which I commonly see, but people who follow this blog tend to be more proactive, which is why I have posted this article.

How do you know if you have a rib hump?

To find out if your rib humps, you will want to take your shirt off and bend forward to try and touch your toes. Have someone take a picture of your back, and post it to the comments below. If we see something that suggests rib humping, the next step is to find a structural chiropractor and someone who focuses on athletes.

They would do a structural examination, which may include x-rays, and this would determine if you’re a candidate for their care and if you in fact have any curvature to the spine or scoliosis.

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